Friday, July 10, 2015

L-ascorbic acid, vitamin C

L-ascorbic acid, vitamin C


Ever wonder why some Vitamin C products work and some don't??? 
 
Many companies have used derivatives of vitamin C, such as ascorbyl palmitate and magnesium ascorbyl phosphate to produce vitamin C. Derivatives are easier to stabilize, but they are not L-ascorbic acid, which is the Only form of vitamin C the body can use. When the label says "vitamin C", it doesn't mean the product contains the left-handed ascorbic acid (L-ascorbic acid)!!!
 
Recent studies indicate that vitamin C derivatives do not perform the same way as topical L- ascorbic acid. These studies show that derivatives are either not absorbed or not converted to L- ascorbic acid in high enough concentrations to have an effect.
 
What is the Left-handed Ascorbic acid (L-ascorbic acid) and its important?
 
All molecules exist in left-handed and right-handed form. Like our hands, the molecules are perfect mirrored images of each other, making them exact opposites.  
Our body can use either the right or the left handed form of any given molecule,
but not the other.  
Also, Ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) exists as L-ascorbic acid (L for levo meaning left) and D- ascorbic acid (D for dextro meaning right).
 
L- ascorbic acid is the most important part of ascorbic acid as it is good for skin and body system. It promotes health at the molecular level.  
D- ascorbic acid is not a good part for skin and body system. It promotes drying, itching, and burning.
 
Just as we could not put a right-handed glove on our left hand - even though they are mirror images of each other - scientists now understand that the law of handedness applies to all asymmetric structures of life. Although compounds comprised of these "molecular twins" contain seemingly identical right and left handed mirror images of one another, their effects on human physiology are completely different. While molecules of one "hand" are necessary to life, such as L-amino acids and D-sugars, scientists have learned that their mirror image or opposite "hand" will usually exhibit different effects, ranging from harmless to toxic or even poisonous.
 
The handedness of a mirror - compound is described in chemistry by using the term "L" to define the left side of a molecular twin (the L- Isomer) and the term "D" to define the right side or the D-Isomer.  
 
Our body system is sensitive to handedness correctness, that when simultaneously presented with both sides of a compound it will do one of three things. Either it will: 1. Recognize and use one side and discard the other as waste· or 2. The two sides being present at the same time cancel one another · or 3. The side that is incompatible with human physiology will cause harm.
 
It is now clearly understood that many of the unfortunate side-effects of prescription drugs are caused by handedness incorrectness.
 
Topical vitamin C must be in the form of L-ascorbic acid to be useful to skin. L- ascorbic acid is unstable and tends to break down rapidly, hence it is complicated to produce for cosmetic preparations. But once L- ascorbic acid absorbed into the skin, many studies show that L-ascorbic acid stimulates collagen synthesis, provides photoprotection, stays in the skin or up to 72 hours, and prevents UV immunosuppression.
 
Benefits of L-ascorbic acid
 
Vitamin C is known as a powerful antioxidant. Antioxidants protect skin by neutralizing free radicals, which would otherwise destroy skin and its components. These free radicals are stimulated by ultraviolet light and also occur naturally in the oxygen atmosphere. 
 
L-ascorbic Acid and Collagen 
 
Vitamin C is the only antioxidant that has been proven to increase collagen synthesis. Formation of collagen is essential for body growth, tissue repair and wound healing to maintain healthy skin. Studies show that collagen decreases with aging and that photo-aging accelerates the decrease. L-ascorbic acid serves as a signal, relaying a critical message to collagen genes to synthesize collagen, as well as being a cofactor for two enzymes important in collagen synthesis.

Ineffective Vitamin C Preparations 
 
Have you ever wonder WHY some products work and some don't???
 
Many companies have used derivatives of vitamin C, such as ascorbyl palmitate and magnesium ascorbyl phosphate to produce vitamin C. Derivatives are easier to stabilize, but they are not L-ascorbic acid, which is the only form of vitamin C the body can use. When the label says "vitamin C", it doesn't mean the product contains the left-handed ascorbic acid.
 
Recent studies indicate that vitamin C derivatives do not perform the same way as topical L- ascorbic acid. These studies show that derivatives are either not absorbed or not converted to L- ascorbic acid in high enough concentrations to have an effect.
  
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