Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Watercress


It is very easy to grow Watercress at home, just soil, some sunlight and water. Fresh vegetable and decoration on your dining table.

 


Watercress
: Gram for gram, watercress contains more vitamin C than oranges, four times more beta-carotene and vitamin A than apples, tomatoes and broccoli, more vitamin E than broccoli, more calcium than whole milk and more iron than spinach.
It also contains lutein and zeaxanthin (45 times that of tomatoes and more than triple the amount in broccoli).
It is also the richest dietary source of PEITC (phenylethyl isothiocyanate) which research suggests can fight cancer.
 



Cruciferous vegetables, such as watercress and broccoli, are well known for containing glucosinolates, phytochemicals that are hydrolyzed to produce isothiocyanates, which have been studied for their anticancer effects. Dietary intake of these compounds has been shown to counter breast, lung, colorectal, head and neck, and prostate cancers.

 
This Green Veggie for Better Workout Results by Cynthia Sass. As a board certified sports RD, I often explain to my clients that while exercise is necessary for seeing results in strength, endurance, and body composition, it also takes a toll on the body. The wear and tear and increased demand can create more free radicals, nasty substances that contribute to DNA damage. That’s why a nutrient-rich diet that neutralizes free radicals and allows the body to heal goes hand in hand with training.

 

In this particular study, ten healthy young men were given a small bag of watercress, about 3 ounces, daily for eight weeks. The participants were then asked to execute treadmill workouts that included short bursts of intense exercise. Another group, which was not given watercress also performed the treadmill workout after eight-week as a control.

 

The athletes who had not eaten watercress experienced more DNA damage, and for the watercress consumers, the benefits were seen after just one dose. In other words, the nutrients didn’t need to accumulate over days. Those who ate the veggie just two hours before hitting the treadmill experienced the same benefits as those who had munched on it daily for two months. Pretty powerful stuff!


Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/ 

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